How do we call the repetition of sounds in the verses of a strophe?

Trivia Crack Question: How do we call the repetition of sounds in the verses of a strophe?
Trivia Crack Answer: Rhyme

About Rhymes

The repetition of sounds in the verses of a strophe is called a rhyme. A strophe is a set of stanzas in a poem, and verses are a single line within a poem or a collection of lines. Rhymes are classified as words or syllables that repeat similar sounds in slightly different ways, such as “love” and “dove.” There are also “identical rhymes,” which is when a word is set to rhyme with itself. The craft of choosing rhyming words, such as for poetry, has to do with syllables: to create effective and pleasing rhymes, poets, songwriters, and other artists usually have to ensure that the repeated sounds within words occur on the same syllable of each words. For example “codfish” and “dish” form a less-than-perfect rhyme because “dish” has only one syllable, and does not have the same rhythm as “codfish.” Rhymes are widely used in songs and poems, and have been in use since the ancient Greeks. Rap music and hip hop in particular stresses rhyming words and complex plays on words, while Shakespeare’s plays incorporate a special kind of poetic format called blank verse. Sonnets and couplets are also common poetic formats using rhymes.

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